Tag Archives: NICU environment

On Becoming a Caregiver: Part I

“No society can long sustain itself unless its members have learned the sensitivities, motivations and skills involved in assisting and caring for other human beings.”      -Urie Bronfenbrenner

The process of becoming a caregiver has always intrigued me, ever since I decided, many years ago, to become an early childhood special educator. As part of this process I volunteered at schools, institutions, and sheltered workshops that provided services to both children and adults with physical and learning disabilities. I was struck by the comments from family, relatives, friends and even individuals, newly introduced to me, when they discovered that I was interested in becoming a special educator. They often praised me for my interest in caring for these children and adults. This praise was usually followed by “I could never do that, it would just be too difficult for me;” or “It takes a ‘special’ kind of person to do that kind of work.”

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Nourishing and Nurturing during Feedings

professional photo E Ross cropped

Erin Sundseth Ross, PhD, CCC-SLP

Feeding is a developmental milestone for babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) – both for those born prematurely, and for those born with medical problems. Even though we are saving babies who have more medical problems, or who are very premature, the average gestational age that babies are able to eat everything and go home continues to be around 36–37 weeks. Babies born with medical problems are often not able to eat everything until closer to their due dates (40 weeks).

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An Irish Mother’s Journey: Preterm Birth and Beyond, Part 2

Mandy Head Shot cropped reduced res

Mandy Daly, Dip. H Diet & Nutrition, Dip. Ki Massage, ACII, DLDU

My perceptions of motherhood prior to the birth of Amelia were filled with moments of touching, loving, holding, breathing in her smell, caressing and caring, however, the reality that I was faced with was so very different. For three months I traveled 90 minutes each way to spend 12 to 14 hours sitting at my daughter’s incubator. There was very little touching or caressing her tiny frame. The only smells detectable were the smells of the hand sanitizers, the hand wash soaps and the unit’s cleaning products. I didn’t get to hold Amelia until she was four weeks old even though my baby girl lay inches away from my tear stained face. I reached out to her in my head and heart and I’m certain that you could hear my heart beating in my chest every time her monitor alarms triggered.

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Shedding Light on the Newborn Intensive Care Nursery

Kathy V photo[1]

Kathleen A. VandenBerg, PhD, NIDCAP Master Trainer

Parents often experience shock when their baby is born too early. As they enter the intensive care nursery for the first time, they may note that the environment is not at all what they expected. Instead, they may experience the overwhelming barrage of stimulation that is the newborn intensive care nursery or NICU. Having walked this path with hundreds of parents, I see that they immediately notice the loud ringing sounds that fill the unit: blaring monitors; the constant hum of respirators attached to some of the babies; and most especially the glare of bright lights used for medical procedures.

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